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MWH: Global Conflicts (Self-Determination: Iran)  

Last Updated: May 12, 2017 URL: http://springbrookhs.montgomeryschoolsmd.libguides.com/globalconflictsiran Print Guide RSS Updates
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Background Information

The Shah of Iran came to power in the early 1950's. He was backed by the United States for security against the Soviet Union. However, the Shah conducted an extremely oppressive regieme against opposition elements, especially the Shite Islamic community. Resentment boiled over when then U.S offered asylum to the Shah in 1977. The U.S embassy was overrun and hostages taken. Iran eventually began testing  medium and long-range missiles and is currently trying to build a nuclear weapon among the disapproval of the US and other western powers.  After many sanctions, Iran lashed out at its enemies.   The British flag was burned and  American hikers were kidnapped and accused of espionage.

Vocabulary

  • interdependence
  • self-determination
  • domination
      
     

    Identify the Problem & Ask Questions

    How can knowledge of global conflicts help us predict and avoid conflicts in the future?

    What is the primary cause of each conflict?

    • Political Ideology?
    • Self-determination?
    • Limited Resources?
    • National Identity?
    • Religious Differences?
    • Ethnic Differences?

    Who are the people involved? Why are they involved?

    How did the conflict start? Has it ended?

    What has happened as a result of the conflict?

     

    Assignment Specifics

    What is the best way to communicate the information?

    • Poster
    • PowerPoint
    • Prezi

      Search Strategies

      • Locate and search appropriate resources
      • Vary search terms (don't use the same search terms over and over again)
      • Think of synonyms
      • Use Boolean searching
      • Use "quotation marks" to search for exact phrases
      • Be creative (newspaper articles, interviews, political cartoons, and more)

      Some search terms to try:

      • Shi'ite
      • Muslim revolution
      • westernization
      • "axis of evil"
      • nuclear energy
      • Israel
      • uranium
      • United Nations
      • sanctions
      • atomic bomb
      • George W Bush
      • fixed election
      • ballot tampering
      • United Nations Security Council (weapons inspectors)
      • embargo

       

          
         

        RESOURCES

        Usernames and passwords are available in the Library Media Center.

        OR...join the Library Media Center Google Classroom (code available in the Library Media Center).

        SIRS Discoverer (ProQuest)

         

        World History in Context

        x

        ProQuest Databases

        Free Online Resources

        Check Terms of Use/ Licensing before using material found on these sites AND always credit and/or link to the site.

        News

        DE Streaming

         

        ImageQuest

         

        BIBLIOGRAPHIES & CITATIONS

        When you use someone else's words, work, thoughts, and/or ideas, you need to give the person credit. It doesn't matter whether you quote the person word-for-word or put it in your own words (paraphrase), you need to acknowledge where the words, work, thought, or idea originated. Otherwise, you are passing it off as your own.

        Be responsible.

        Be honest.

        Show integrity.

         

        APA (American Psychological Association)

        American Psychological Association (APA) style is most often used in the sciences and social sciences.

        Resources

        Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL)
        APA Formatting & Style Guide

         

        Record Bibliographic Information

        Don't forget to record the following for each source you use:

        • Author/creator
        • Title of article, chapter, film, webpage
        • Page number
        • Name of magazine, newspaper, journal, book, website
        • Publication date
        • Name of subscription database (if used)
        • Format (web, print)
        • Date of access (if found online)

          NoodleTools

          • NoodleTools
            NoodleTools is a bibliographic software tool to assist you in creating accurate source citations in MLA and APA formats.
          Description

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